Our New Campus and the
Future of Education

Our current facilities were designed by award-winning architects Reader + Swartz specifically to promote learning and collaboration, and they look more like a technology startup than a traditional school. Small classrooms surround a central co-working space where every student has his own workspace. We are experts in classroom instruction and engagement so our facilities are focused on academics. For lunch and physical education, we leave campus.

We are easily accessible from Route 7, the Greenway, and Route 28, and are as convenient to western Fairfax County as we are to Loudoun County.

As we are now approaching capacity in our current location, and continue to grow, we have begun plans for a stand-alone building and small campus. Our current space works perfectly for most purposes, but we would like to add some more room to do great things. We are purchasing land in old Ashburn, to restore the 1892 African American schoolhouse on the site, and to build a state-of-the-art building that reflects the history of the site while modeling how learning spaces should be designed. This new building will permit us to continue as a small school primarily focused on academics, while giving us more room for lab sciences, a maker space, an outdoor garden, and outdoor sports.

Below is the design of our new school by our architects Reader + Swartz. We aim to build the most environmentally responsible, healthy, and innovative school space in the county, to create a model of secondary education.


The History of
the Site

Since after the Civil War, the school site has been enormously significant for Loudoun County’s African American community. Charlie Harris, an African American farmer whose barn has been restored and placed at One Loudoun, purchased one acre around 1880 for what would become the Greater Zion Baptist Church (now The Empowerment Church). Below on the left is a picture of the church just before its demolition some years ago.

The community also built a one room schoolhouse in 1892 on an adjacent parcel (image on the right). This is what the schoolhouse looked like in 1940, and the condition to which we would like to return it.


Design Inspiration for the
New Building (“Farmhouse Vernacular”)